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Solid Earth, 7, 1185-1197, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/se-7-1185-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
04 Aug 2016
Digital carbonate rock physics
Erik H. Saenger1,2, Stephanie Vialle3, Maxim Lebedev3, David Uribe4,5, Maria Osorno4, Mandy Duda1, and Holger Steeb4,5 1International Geothermal Centre, 44801 Bochum, Germany
2Institute for Geology, Mineralogy and Geophysics, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, 44801 Bochum, Germany
3Department of Exploration Geophysics, Curtin University, Perth, Australia
4Institute for Mechanics, University of Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart, Germany
5Stuttgart Research Centre for Simulation Technology (SRC SimTech), 70569 Stuttgart, Germany
Abstract. Modern estimation of rock properties combines imaging with advanced numerical simulations, an approach known as digital rock physics (DRP). In this paper we suggest a specific segmentation procedure of X-ray micro-computed tomography data with two different resolutions in the µm range for two sets of carbonate rock samples. These carbonates were already characterized in detail in a previous laboratory study which we complement with nanoindentation experiments (for local elastic properties). In a first step a non-local mean filter is applied to the raw image data. We then apply different thresholds to identify pores and solid phases. Because of a non-neglectable amount of unresolved microporosity (micritic phase) we also define intermediate threshold values for distinct phases. Based on this segmentation we determine porosity-dependent values for effective P- and S-wave velocities as well as for the intrinsic permeability. For effective velocities we confirm an observed two-phase trend reported in another study using a different carbonate data set. As an upscaling approach we use this two-phase trend as an effective medium approach to estimate the porosity-dependent elastic properties of the micritic phase for the low-resolution images. The porosity measured in the laboratory is then used to predict the effective rock properties from the observed trends for a comparison with experimental data. The two-phase trend can be regarded as an upper bound for elastic properties; the use of the two-phase trend for low-resolution images led to a good estimate for a lower bound of effective elastic properties. Anisotropy is observed for some of the considered subvolumes, but seems to be insignificant for the analysed rocks at the DRP scale. Because of the complexity of carbonates we suggest using DRP as a complementary tool for rock characterization in addition to classical experimental methods.

Citation: Saenger, E. H., Vialle, S., Lebedev, M., Uribe, D., Osorno, M., Duda, M., and Steeb, H.: Digital carbonate rock physics, Solid Earth, 7, 1185-1197, https://doi.org/10.5194/se-7-1185-2016, 2016.
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Short summary
Modern estimation of rock properties combines imaging with advanced numerical simulations, an approach known as digital rock physics (DRP). In this paper we suggest a specific segmentation procedure of X-ray micro-computed tomography data with two different resolutions for two sets of carbonate rock samples. These carbonates were already characterized in detail in a previous laboratory study, which we complement with nanoindentation experiments.
Modern estimation of rock properties combines imaging with advanced numerical simulations, an...
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